Illinois Water Supply Planning



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What are the Dimensions of Water Availability in Illinois? (More Information)
 
For more information on the dimensions of water supplies of Illinois, see the following sources of information:
 
Publications:
  Bulletin 39, 45, 50, 52, 57, 60, 62, 64, 66, 67, 68 full text available online, & 71 abstract available online full text available online
  Reports of Investigation 43, 46, 49, 51, 57, 62, & 96
  Circular 43, 172 abstract available online full text available online, & 177
  Miscellaneous publication 60, 77, & 128 full text available online
  Contract Report 440, 441, 128, 469, 477, & 493
   
All publications available on loan from the Illinois State Water Survey Library. Some publications are available online as full-text documents, in pdf form. These publications are followed by the full-text-available symbol: full text available online. Some publications have abstracts online, and are followed by the abstract-available symbol: full text available online.

Other Information:
Regional variability of water resources in Illinois This graphic depicts Illinois' major freshwater sources as a series of stacked overlay maps. Layers include average annual precipitation (in inches, top map), major rivers and their watersheds (middle) and major aquifers (bottom). This depiction demonstrates the regional variability of Illinois' water resources and that the boundaries of watersheds and aquifers do not coincide. Nor do they coincide with political boundaries. Solutions to regional water supply issues must recognize the differing scales of watersheds and aquifers.
 

 
Aquifer water resources in Illinois and surface water intakes This image shows the different water supplies that Illinois utilizes. Again, it helps illustrate that Illinois' water sources vary by region across the state. A map of Illinois is provided, with rough locations of surface water intakes (public water supply), sand/gravel aquifers, and some bedrock aquifers. Source for aquifer boundaries, Illinois State Geological Survey
 

 
Surface water resources in Illinois Surface water supplies are displayed in this graphic.

 

 
Major sand and gravel aquifers This map shows the distribution of major sand and gravel aquifers in Illinois. Major aquifers are defined to be geologic units capable of yielding at least 70 gallons per minute (gpm) from a single well. Major sand and gravel aquifers are generally found within pre-glacial bedrock valleys or along modern streams and rivers. They occur at depths up to 500 feet and are commonly separated from shallower aquifers by layers of less permeable till or fine-grained lacustrine deposits. Source: Illinois State Geological Survey
 

 
Major shallow bedrock aquifers This map shows the distribution of major bedrock aquifers containing potable water within 300 feet of ground surface in Illinois. Major bedrock aquifers are defined to be geologic units capable of yielding at least 70 gpm from a single well. Potable water is defined to be water containing less than 2,500 milligrams per liter (mg/L) of total dissolved solids. Bedrock aquifers within 300 feet of ground surface cover most of northern and central Illinois and are commonly overlain only by thin layers of less permeable silts and clays. Many are directly overlain by shallow or major sand and gravel aquifers allowing direct hydraulic communication between aquifer systems. more...
 

 
Major deep bedrock aquifers This map shows the distribution of major bedrock aquifer units (i.e., geologic units capable of yielding at least 70 gpm from a single well) at depths greater than 500 feet which contain potable water of less than 2,500 mg/L total dissolved solids. Groundwater quality within the deep bedrock aquifers degrades from northwest to southeast in the northern portion of Illinois and the line demarcating the southern extent of the major deep bedrock aquifers is estimated as the extent of potability. These major bedrock aquifers include the Hunton Limestone Megagroup, Ancell Group, Prairie Du Chien Group, Ironton-Galesville Sandstone, and Elmhurst-Mt.Simon Sandstone. Source: Illinois State Geological Survey.
 

 
1971 - 2000 Annual precipitation (inches) Annual precipitation in inches is shown for Illinois in this graphic for the years 1971 to 2000. The ranges across the state are from 36 to 48 inches.
 

 
Annual precipitation in a dry year (inches) - 1956 Annual precipitation for a dry year is shown for Illinois in this graphic for the year 1956. The ranges across the state are from 22 to 40 inches.
 

 
Annual precipitation in a wet year (inches) - 1972 Annual precipitation for a wet year is shown for Illinois in this graphic for the year 1972. The ranges across the state are from greater than 36 to 48 inches.
 

 
MAC hydrology (major aquifers) The Mahomet aquifer is a vital groundwater resource for 15 counties in east-central Illinois. The aquifer supplies agricultural, industrial and drinking water to a 4,000 square mile area that is home to over 800,000 people. Champaign-Urbana, Clinton, Havana, Hoopeston, Lincoln, Mahomet, Morton, Paxton, Pekin, and Rantoul all sit over this aquifer. For more information, see the Mahomet Aquifer Consortium's web-site at: www.mahometaquiferconsortium.org
 

 
Lake Michigan water levels (1860 - 2000) This graphic shows Lake Michigan and Lake Huron water levels for the years of 1860 to 2000. The 15-year moving average levels are displayed as average lake height in feet above sea level.
 

 
Illinois precipitation 1890 - 2000 Here is a simple graphic showing precipitation in Illinois from the year 1837 to 2002. Early data are for St. Louis, MO but there are 10 stations by 1876 and 40 by 1898. Precipitation is displayed as departures in inches from the 1961-1990 average with 7-year running averages.
 

 
Illinois precipitation 1890 - 2000 This graph shows annual mean temperature in Illinois from 1830 to 2001 and 5-year moving averages as departures from the 1961-1990 average. The record for 1830 to 1850 is based on temperature records for Chicago normalized to the 1961-1990 Midway data. The 1851 to 1995 record is based on Global Historical Climate Network (GHCN) data for Illinois, St. Louis, Missouri, and Dubuque, Iowa. The 1996 to 2001 record is based on data from the National Climate Data Center.
 

 
Illinois precipitation 1890 - 2000 This table contains the wettest and driest years in Illinois from 1895 to 2002. These precipitation amounts are averaged for the entire state. Record years for the driest and wettest years span 1901 to 1993, respectively.
 


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